Great escape of Wildfowl from Eagle at Jim Corbett

Great escape of Wildfowl from Eagle at Jim Corbett

The Moment i encountered this scene on Forest Safari,from a distance i though eagle was eating a kill, i couldn't even recognise that its a jungle fowl, So in aspiration to shoot the eagle in close encounter, we switched off the jeep engine as its a slope terrian and we were very slowly moving towards the eagle by controlling the break of vehicle on the road. This bird was watching us without eating the prey. From 40 feet away we almost came close to 15 feet taking pictures at every 5 feet of jeep forward moment, When we were really close then i suddenly realised that its jungle fowl and i was almost certain that its dead by all means as there is no sign of moment or sound from jungle fowl all through 4 minutes of our sighting, When we were very close to eagle it suddenly left the jungle fowl made a take off, Then comes the real shock "With two feathers of Jungle fowl in air, It ran like Usain bolt into the forest" I could not stop laughing for atleast 5 minutes. The Great Escape !! I felt little bad that i was not prepared to shoot the great escape assuming the prey is dead. Lessons learnt :-) 

Kingfisher Male Tiger at Kanha Tiger Reserve

Kingfisher Male Tiger at Kanha Tiger Reserve

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Kingfisher Male Tiger morning walk at Kanha Tiger Reserve

Kingfisher Male Tiger morning walk at Kanha Tiger Reserve

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Kingfisher Male Tiger into my eyes

Kingfisher Male Tiger into my eyes

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Indian roller at Kanha National Park

Indian roller at Kanha National Park

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Jackal at Kanha National Park

Jackal at Kanha National Park

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Barasingha at Kanha National Park

Barasingha at Kanha National Park

Kanha National Park, also known as Kanha Tiger Reserve, is a vast expanse of grassland and forest in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Tigers, jackals and wild pigs can be spotted in Kanha Meadows. The elevated plateau of Bamhnidadar is home to birds of prey. Animals often gather at the watering holes of Sondar Tank and Babathenga Tank. The park’s flora and fauna are documented in the park's Kanha Museum

Peacock at Dudhwa National Park

Peacock at Dudhwa National Park

The Dudhwa National Park is in the Terai of Uttar Pradesh, India, and covers an area of 490.3 km2 (189.3 sq mi), It is part of the Dudhwa Tiger Reserve. Located on the Indo-Nepal border in the district Lakhimpur-Kheri in Uttar Pradesh, together with Dudhwa National Park and Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuaries, represent the best natural forests and grasslands left in the Terai region of Uttar Pradesh.

The Park has a sizable number of tigers and leopards, although the thick vegetation makes it difficult to spot one.

Rhinoceros cub at Dudhwa National Park

Rhinoceros cub at Dudhwa National Park

The word 'Rhinoceros' is a combination of two Greek words - Rhino means nose and Keros means horn, that is a creature with horn on its nose. 

Fossils discovered in many locations in North America, Europe, Africa and Asia confirms the first appearance of Rhino like animals i.e. Hyrachus on earth 60-40 million years ago. Its size was somewhat between that of a large dog and a horse. After 20-30 million years Hyrachus developed long slender legs with three toes on each foot and were known as Hyracodon. A lot more changes occurred in the Rhino throughout the period. Around one million year ago the Rhino like animal was called as Coelodonta, i.e. wooly rhinoceros. 

Head shot of Rhinoceros cub at Dudhwa National Park

Head shot of Rhinoceros cub at Dudhwa National Park

The word 'Rhinoceros' is a combination of two Greek words - Rhino means nose and Keros means horn, that is a creature with horn on its nose. 

Fossils discovered in many locations in North America, Europe, Africa and Asia confirms the first appearance of Rhino like animals i.e. Hyrachus on earth 60-40 million years ago. Its size was somewhat between that of a large dog and a horse. After 20-30 million years Hyrachus developed long slender legs with three toes on each foot and were known as Hyracodon. A lot more changes occurred in the Rhino throughout the period. Around one million year ago the Rhino like animal was called as Coelodonta, i.e. wooly rhinoceros. 

Nilgai at dudhwa national park

Nilgai at dudhwa national park

The nilgai or blue bull literally meaning "blue cow";  is the largest Asian antelope and is endemic to the Indian subcontinent. The sole member of the genus Boselaphus, the species was described and given its binomial name by German zoologist Peter Simon Pallas in 1766. The nilgai stands 1–1.5 metres (3.3–4.9 ft) at the shoulder; males weigh 109–288 kilograms (240–635 lb), and the lighter females 100–213 kilograms (220–470 lb)

Marabou Storks at Dudhwa National Park

Marabou Storks at Dudhwa National Park

Here are five interesting facts about them:

These large storks grow up to 1.5 metres tall and their wingspan is over 3 metres wide, which is one of the largest in the world.  The males have large air sacs on their throats that are using for calling.

They have disgusting eating habits, eating carrion, garbage and even poo.  They also eat a lot of live animals, including frogs, birds, fish, small mammals, insects and reptiles.

Like many vultures, marabou storks don’t have feathers on their head or neck so that blood doesn’t caught in it when they are eating dead animals.  Also like vultures, they have a very important role to play in the environment by cleaning up carcasses and reducing the risk of disease.

At breeding time, marabou storks gather in large colonies, with the females laying 2-3 eggs in large nests made out of stick in trees, on cliff edges and even on buildings.

Marabou storks are very common and can be found throughout the southern half of Africa, near water and around towns and cities.

Crocodile at Dudhwa National Park

Crocodile at Dudhwa National Park

Crocodiles belong to Crocodylidae family, an ancient group of reptiles in existence for millions of years. The survival of the crocodilians over a long period of earth history is perhaps due to their needs being easily met, living as they do on the edge of two life zones, water and land and being able to find their prey from both zones.

Dudhwa Tiger Reserve have two types of crocodiles - Marsh crocodile or Mugger and Ghanal. Both crocodilians show certain structural adaptations for a successful aquatic life. The nostril is placed at the tip of the snout enabling the animal to breathe when the rest of the body is submerged. The eye has a transparent third eyelid permitting limited underwater vision. Crocodilians are excellent swimmers, thetail being the main propellent.

Male tiger at Dhudwa National Park

Male tiger at Dhudwa National Park

Dudhwa National Park is stretched in an area across 810 square kilometers. The core area of the park itself is spanned around 650 square Kilometers. Although Dudhwa National Park has a range of animal as well as avian population, the park is famous as a perfect habitat for Swamp deer and Tigers. Dudhwa National Park was declared a national park in the year 1958. In the due course, keeping in mind its importance, it was first converted to a wildlife sanctuary in the year 1977 and was later declared a Project Tiger reserve in the year 1988. 

The park shares its northern stretch with Nepal whereas its southern border stretches alongside River Suheli. The park is a brainchild of 'Billy' Arjan Singh, one of India's leading wildlife conservationists, who was instrumental in the creation of Dudhwa as a sanctuary of the Swamp Deer. Later he successfully hand-reared and introduced zoo-born Tigers and Leopards into the wilds of Dudhwa 

As said above, the Major attractions of Dudhwa National Park are the Swamp Deer and Tigers. There are as many as 1500 deer and 100 tigers in the park when the last census was done. The park also boasts off a considerable number of the One-horned Rhino. Other major wildlife attractions are Elephants, Sloth bear, Jackal, Wild pig, Fishing cat, Leopard, Jungle cat and Civet apart from 40 odd species of mammals. Dudhwa also boasts off quite a good range of migratory birds that settle here during winters. It includes among others, painted storks, black and white necked storks, Saras-Cranes, woodpeckers, barbets, kingfishers, minivans, bee-eaters, bulbuls and varied night birds of prey, ranging from the great Indian horned owl to the jungle owlet. 

female tiger at Dudhwa National park

female tiger at Dudhwa National park

Dudhwa National Park is stretched in an area across 810 square kilometers. The core area of the park itself is spanned around 650 square Kilometers. Although Dudhwa National Park has a range of animal as well as avian population, the park is famous as a perfect habitat for Swamp deer and Tigers. Dudhwa National Park was declared a national park in the year 1958. In the due course, keeping in mind its importance, it was first converted to a wildlife sanctuary in the year 1977 and was later declared a Project Tiger reserve in the year 1988. 

The park shares its northern stretch with Nepal whereas its southern border stretches alongside River Suheli. The park is a brainchild of 'Billy' Arjan Singh, one of India's leading wildlife conservationists, who was instrumental in the creation of Dudhwa as a sanctuary of the Swamp Deer. Later he successfully hand-reared and introduced zoo-born Tigers and Leopards into the wilds of Dudhwa 

As said above, the Major attractions of Dudhwa National Park are the Swamp Deer and Tigers. There are as many as 1500 deer and 100 tigers in the park when the last census was done. The park also boasts off a considerable number of the One-horned Rhino. Other major wildlife attractions are Elephants, Sloth bear, Jackal, Wild pig, Fishing cat, Leopard, Jungle cat and Civet apart from 40 odd species of mammals. Dudhwa also boasts off quite a good range of migratory birds that settle here during winters. It includes among others, painted storks, black and white necked storks, Saras-Cranes, woodpeckers, barbets, kingfishers, minivans, bee-eaters, bulbuls and varied night birds of prey, ranging from the great Indian horned owl to the jungle owlet. 

Female Tiger at Dudhwa national Park

Female Tiger at Dudhwa national Park

Dudhwa National Park is stretched in an area across 810 square kilometers. The core area of the park itself is spanned around 650 square Kilometers. Although Dudhwa National Park has a range of animal as well as avian population, the park is famous as a perfect habitat for Swamp deer and Tigers. Dudhwa National Park was declared a national park in the year 1958. In the due course, keeping in mind its importance, it was first converted to a wildlife sanctuary in the year 1977 and was later declared a Project Tiger reserve in the year 1988. 

The park shares its northern stretch with Nepal whereas its southern border stretches alongside River Suheli. The park is a brainchild of 'Billy' Arjan Singh, one of India's leading wildlife conservationists, who was instrumental in the creation of Dudhwa as a sanctuary of the Swamp Deer. Later he successfully hand-reared and introduced zoo-born Tigers and Leopards into the wilds of Dudhwa 

As said above, the Major attractions of Dudhwa National Park are the Swamp Deer and Tigers. There are as many as 1500 deer and 100 tigers in the park when the last census was done. The park also boasts off a considerable number of the One-horned Rhino. Other major wildlife attractions are Elephants, Sloth bear, Jackal, Wild pig, Fishing cat, Leopard, Jungle cat and Civet apart from 40 odd species of mammals. Dudhwa also boasts off quite a good range of migratory birds that settle here during winters. It includes among others, painted storks, black and white necked storks, Saras-Cranes, woodpeckers, barbets, kingfishers, minivans, bee-eaters, bulbuls and varied night birds of prey, ranging from the great Indian horned owl to the jungle owlet. 

Barking deer or Muntjacs at Jim Corbett National Park

Barking deer or Muntjacs at Jim Corbett National Park

Muntjacs, also known as barking deer and Mastreani deer, are small deer of the genus Muntiacus. Muntjacs are the eldest deer

Tiger Cub at Jim Corbett National Park

Tiger Cub at Jim Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park, which is a part of the larger Corbett Tiger Reserve, a Project Tiger Reserve lies in the Nainital district of Uttarakhand. The magical landscape of Corbett is well known and fabled for its tiger richness. Established in the year 1936 as Hailey National Park, Corbett has the glory of being India's oldest and most prestigious National Park. It is also being honored as the place where Project Tiger was first launched in 1973. This unique tiger territory is best known as the father who gave birth of the Project Tiger in India to protect the most endangered species and the Royal of India called Tigers. 

Spans over an extent of 520 square kilometers, its whole area comprises of hills, marshy depressions, riverine belts, grasslands and large lake. It is among the few tiger reserves in India that allows overnight stays in the lap of the National Park. Nature watch and wildlife viewing in the park is done in an open four wheeler Jeep and on elephant back. Sheltering a healthy population of tigers and rare species like Otters and the endemic fish eating crocodile, the national park is one of the most sought after destinations for the wildlife buffs. Dhikala, situated at the border of the extensive Patil Dun valley, is the most popular destination in Corbett because of its superb location and sheer abundance of wildlife present.

Pied or Black and White Kingfisher at Jim Corbett National Park

Pied or Black and White Kingfisher at Jim Corbett National Park

The pied kingfisher is a water kingfisher and is found widely distributed across Africa and Asia. Originally described by Linnaeus in 1758, it has five recognised subspecies. Its black and white plumage, crest and the habit of hovering over clear lakes and rivers before diving for fish make it distinctive. Males have a double band across the breast while females have a single gorget that is often broken in the middle. They are usually found in pairs or small family parties. When perched, they often bob their head and flick up their tail.

White throated Bushchat or Hodgson's Bushchat at Jim Corbett

White throated Bushchat or Hodgson's Bushchat at Jim Corbett

White throated Bushchat or Hodgson's Bushchat (Saxicola insignis) - mountains of Mongolia  and adjacent parts of Russia, wintering in the Terai of Nepal and northern India of Jim Corbett

Black and White bird at Jim Corbett National Park

Black and White bird at Jim Corbett National Park

im Corbett National Park, which is a part of the larger Corbett Tiger Reserve, a Project Tiger Reserve lies in the Nainital district of Uttarakhand. The magical landscape of Corbett is well known and fabled for its tiger richness. Established in the year 1936 as Hailey National Park, Corbett has the glory of being India's oldest and most prestigious National Park. It is also being honored as the place where Project Tiger was first launched in 1973. This unique tiger territory is best known as the father who gave birth of the Project Tiger in India to protect the most endangered species and the Royal of India called Tigers. 

Spans over an extent of 520 square kilometers, its whole area comprises of hills, marshy depressions, riverine belts, grasslands and large lake. It is among the few tiger reserves in India that allows overnight stays in the lap of the National Park. Nature watch and wildlife viewing in the park is done in an open four wheeler Jeep and on elephant back. Sheltering a healthy population of tigers and rare species like Otters and the endemic fish eating crocodile, the national park is one of the most sought after destinations for the wildlife buffs. Dhikala, situated at the border of the extensive Patil Dun valley, is the most popular destination in Corbett because of its superb location and sheer abundance of wildlife present.